Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

First glimpse of ‘Speaking the Piano’

Posted by Susan Tomes on 23 May 2018 under Books  •  Leave a comment

My new book ‘Speaking the Piano‘ is due out from Boydell Press in about three weeks’ time. It’s about my experiences of learning and teaching music. In essence it’s a love letter to the joys and benefits of learning an instrument to a high level. Today I received my first pre-publication copy (see photo). It […]

Checking proofs of my new book

Posted by Susan Tomes on 18 March 2018 under Books, Daily Life, Musings  •  2 Comments

Over the last few days I have been checking the proofs of my new book, Speaking the Piano, due out in June from Boydell Press (see photo). Before we got to this point, there have been several other stages of editing. Various friends read the manuscript and gave their advice. My editor at Boydell sent […]

‘Speaking the Piano’ – my new book, due out in June

Posted by Susan Tomes on 22 January 2018 under Books, Inspirations  •  1 Comment

I have a new book, Speaking the Piano, due out in June from Boydell Press. My previous four books are about performance. This new one is about my experiences of learning and teaching (though performance sneaks in too). The title was inspired by a remark of Artur Schnabel’s teacher, Leschetitzky, to the effect that he […]

A piano in every Victorian home …

Posted by Susan Tomes on 7 December 2017 under Books, Musings  •  Leave a comment

I’ve been reading ‘Tales and Travels of a School Inspector‘ by John Wilson, an account of travelling round the Highlands and Islands of Scotland in the Victorian era, in the years after the groundbreaking 1872 Education Act which gave every child between the ages of 5 and 10 the right to schooling. If the children […]

Andrew Solomon’s ‘Far from the Tree’

Posted by Susan Tomes on 28 September 2017 under Books, Concerts, Musings  •  1 Comment

I’m reading Andrew Solomon’s fascinating ‘Far from the Tree’, a 900-page study of parents ‘who learn to deal with their exceptional children and find profound meaning in doing so’. Many of the chapters focus on conditions which are obviously challenging for families: autism, schizophrenia, deafness, disability, crime, sexual orientation, dwarfs. In the middle of the […]