Archive for the ‘Concerts’ Category

Playing along with someone else’s recording

Posted by Susan Tomes on 23 February 2022 under Concerts, Musings  •  Leave a comment

On Saturday, I shall be playing Mozart’s last piano concerto  – the B flat major, K595 – with the Meadows Chamber Orchestra in Edinburgh. Since I don’t have an in-house orchestra, I have been preparing by playing along with a recording. We have three CDs in the house – two played by Clifford Curzon (different […]

Continual assessment

Posted by Susan Tomes on 9 October 2021 under Concerts, Musings, Reviews  •  Leave a comment

A friend of mine has been musing on this question: How many other professionals are subjected to continual public assessment the way musicians are? For a long time, musicians have put up with being publicly reviewed because good reviews can bring them quickly to the attention of ‘movers and shakers’ around the world. At least, […]

‘Es ist genug’: Bach’s chorale opens a BBCSO concert

Posted by Susan Tomes on 27 September 2021 under Concerts, Daily Life, Inspirations  •  1 Comment

One of the most depressing sights of lockdown in Edinburgh – for me, anyway – was the sight of the Usher Hall being turned into a Covid test centre. I know that test centres are important. But it seemed a sad change of fortune for the first big concert hall I got to know. In […]

Interview and podcast for ‘The Music Show’ on ABC Radio in Australia

Posted by Susan Tomes on 18 September 2021 under Concerts  •  Leave a comment

This week I did an interview about my book ‘The Piano’ with Andrew Ford, the knowledgeable host of ABC’s long-running ‘Music Show‘ in Australia. He has woven in archive clips of other pianists talking or playing favourite music, so it has become an pleasing mosaic of views on the piano’s wonderful repertoire. The whole thing […]

Knitting

Posted by Susan Tomes on 12 September 2021 under Concerts, Daily Life, Musings  •  2 Comments

Last week I was thinking of writing a blog post about knitting. What is the connection between knitting and pianism, you may ask? Well, I had been reading about the 19th-century pianist Clara Schumann, who continued to tour and earn money for the family after her composer husband Robert had died. At that time it […]