Archive for the ‘Concerts’ Category

Instant Commentary

Posted by Susan Tomes on 9 December 2010 under Concerts, Daily Life, Musings  •  1 Comment

Interesting article the other day in The Guardian about the fact that many people now chat online about what they’re watching on TV, while they’re watching it. They don’t wait for the end of the programme, but start commenting on Twitter right away about things that annoy them, please them, or make them laugh. TV […]

Ear of the beholder

Posted by Susan Tomes on 24 November 2010 under Concerts, Daily Life, Musings  •  Leave a comment

To a viol masterclass given by the eiminent Catalan viol player Jordi Savall at the Royal College of Music. As always happens when I listen to ‘early music’, it took me a little while to tune in to the quiet sound level favoured by the players. It’s so different from the strong, projected sound used […]

A morning with Goritzki

Posted by Susan Tomes on 19 November 2010 under Concerts, Inspirations  •  2 Comments

Went to a marvellous cello masterclass given by Johannes Goritzki at the Royal College of Music. He spent hours persuading the students that playing the cello was easier than they thought, just a matter of applying weight in the right place, not working against the natural functions of muscles, understanding that the cello bow can […]

Asymmetrical viola

Posted by Susan Tomes on 17 November 2010 under Concerts, Musings  •  Leave a comment

Here’s something I hadn’t seen before: an asymmetrical viola. Its owner, Rivka Golani, showed it to us when Bob interviewed her for Putney Music society this week. Rivka explained that the maker of the viola, Otto Erdesz, believed that the unusual cut-out on the treble side of the viola (that’s the left-hand side as we […]

The meaning of sparseness

Posted by Susan Tomes on 15 November 2010 under Concerts, Musings  •  1 Comment

At ChamberStudio yesterday we were working on a piece by Prokofiev. We were discussing the kind of piano writing that’s often found in works by Russian composers of the Soviet era. As the writing is typically rather spare and empty-looking on the page, with a deliberate avoidance of opulence, it’s very difficult to intuit the […]

 

« previous page  1 2 ... 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 ... 51 52   next page »
« previous page  1 2   next page »