Archive for the ‘Concerts’ Category

Love-hate relationships

Posted by Susan Tomes on 29 October 2009 under Concerts, Daily Life, Musings  •  Leave a comment

Fascinating article in today’s Guardian about the hidden antagonism which some top sportsmen feel, or come to feel, towards their chosen sport. It seems they’re reluctant to voice such feelings because they know the general public regards them as fortunate beyond belief to be living the life that they do. ‘I play tennis for a […]

Quartet Heaven

Posted by Susan Tomes on 28 October 2009 under Concerts, Daily Life, Musings  •  Leave a comment

We had dinner last night with a friend who plays professionally in a string quartet. He’d been coaching a young string quartet from Paris. They got to talking about rehearsal venues, always a vexing problem for chamber groups and one that I and my friends have never successfully resolved. We generally travel long distances to […]

Talking about performance

Posted by Susan Tomes on 20 October 2009 under Books, Concerts, Daily Life, Musings  •  2 Comments

In the past few days I’ve spent some time studying scores of pieces I’m going to be teaching in a masterclass at the RSAMD this week. The date has been in my diary for a long time, but because the academic year only began a couple of weeks ago, it was impossible to find out who the students would […]

Choosing a piano

Posted by Susan Tomes on 18 October 2009 under Concerts, Daily Life, Florestan Trio  •  2 Comments

To Steinway Hall in London, to choose a piano for the Florestan Trio’s  Hyperion recording of Shostakovich next January. Whenever I’m able to select an piano, I have to do my research well ahead of time, because the best ones get booked up months in advance. Each piano is slightly different from the next, so for each new […]

Waving a stick

Posted by Susan Tomes on 9 October 2009 under Concerts, Daily Life, Musings  •  Leave a comment

Philippa Ibbotson’s article in Wednesday’s Guardian about ‘the myth of the maestro’ has stirred up a lot of interest. Last time I looked, there were about 130 comments on the Guardian blog. The article questioned the enormous fees paid to orchestral conductors, especially at a time when those fees represent ‘a large slice of a […]