Archive for the ‘Daily Life’ Category

Reviews: how can we quote them if the press doesn’t print them?

Posted by Susan Tomes on 10 June 2016 under Concerts, Daily Life, Musings, Reviews  •  3 Comments

Two recent topics of conversation have come together in my mind to prompt a question. Topic 1: the number of classical concert reviews is shrinking rapidly. Everyone in the profession has noticed it. Many newspapers are reducing the number of classical reviews they print and the number of days a week on which they print […]

Vigilance

Posted by Susan Tomes on 6 June 2016 under Daily Life, Musings  •  2 Comments

We have a lovely cat, Daisy, whom we ‘rescued’ from a cat shelter. Shortly after she moved in, another cat got in through the catflap one evening. We were out and didn’t see what happened, but the two cats had clearly had an epic struggle. Clumps of cat fur were on the stairs. Objects were […]

A moment of visibility

Posted by Susan Tomes on 23 May 2016 under Daily Life, Musings  •  3 Comments

At the weekend I had an unusual experience. Following the conclusion of BBC Young Musician and viewers’ anger that the result was so under-reported, I wrote a letter to The Guardian about the wider issue. We’ve heard a lot recently about orchestras folding, opera companies struggling, and arts companies disappearing as their funding dries up. Within the profession there’s […]

My letter in today’s Guardian

Posted by Susan Tomes on 21 May 2016 under Daily Life, Inspirations, Musings, Teaching  •  6 Comments

In today’s Guardian I have a letter which aroused quite a lot of interest when it appeared online yesterday. Please share it if you agree. Here’s what I said: ‘Much of the recent discourse around classical music and its troubles has contained a subtext of glee at the notion that a privileged class is getting […]

Portraying isolation

Posted by Susan Tomes on 1 February 2016 under Daily Life, Musings  •  4 Comments

Today I went to the BP Portrait Exhibition, a favourite annual exhibition. As for some years now, the emphasis was on near-photographic realism, achieved with admirable technical skill but occasionally at the expense of ‘suggestiveness’ if I could put it like that. By which I mean that as I gazed at the portraits, my thoughts seemed […]