Archive for the ‘Teaching’ Category

Piano Power

Posted by Susan Tomes on 24 August 2021 under Daily Life, Musings, Teaching  •  4 Comments

Recently I’ve heard or coached a number of amateur pianists whose playing I haven’t heard for 18 months, or before All This started. I had been afraid that everyone’s playing would have fallen apart, but actually my impression was that lockdown has enhanced rather than degraded the skills of the people I’ve been listening to. […]

Education via electronic communication

Posted by Susan Tomes on 7 June 2021 under Musings, Teaching  •  Leave a comment

As the university year draws to an end, some of my friends who teach at universities have been reflecting sadly on the experience of doing their job online for an entire year. Many of them did all their teaching without ever meeting their students in person. Everything was done by Zoom and the like. Poor […]

A taste of elsewhere

Posted by Susan Tomes on 25 February 2021 under Daily Life, Inspirations, Teaching  •  1 Comment

In a cheese shop the other day, conversation turned to exotic cheeses and someone mentioned Gjetost, the Norwegian goat’s milk cheese which looks like a block of fudge and has a distinctive, caramel element to its taste. It’s a cooked cheese made with whey and cream, very rich and usually eaten in wafer-thin slivers. Mention […]

‘She taught me that every step has meaning’

Posted by Susan Tomes on 6 December 2020 under Concerts, Musings, Teaching  •  1 Comment

The other day I was listening to a ballet dancer reminiscing on radio about the time when, as a girl, she took part in a ballet masterclass given by Dame Margot Fonteyn. Dame Margot, it seems, was more terrifying in person than the students had expected. ‘She hardly smiled at all during the class’. But […]

Remembering an old college friend

Posted by Susan Tomes on 23 July 2020 under Daily Life, Musings, Teaching  •  4 Comments

Today is a melancholy day, the funeral of one of my first college friends. He had battled for years with depression, anxiety and a cascade of associated health problems. His passing led to a burst of correspondence between those of us in his circle in those university years. We agreed that if we had been […]