Archive for the ‘Teaching’ Category

The soft-closing piano lid

Posted by Susan Tomes on 16 March 2013 under Concerts, Musings, Teaching  •  2 Comments

I have had a delightful letter from a piano trio in Tokyo, asking for advice about how to perform Judith Weir’s first Piano Trio. The work ends with the pianist banging shut the lid over the piano keyboard, dryly snapping everyone out of the realm of music and back into the real world. The moment […]

Brahms’s early thoughts

Posted by Susan Tomes on 11 March 2013 under Concerts, Inspirations, Teaching  •  1 Comment

Yesterday I gave some coaching to the Minerva Piano Trio, who had brought the first version of Brahms’s B major Trio opus 8. He composed it around 1853-54, at the time when he first got to know the Schumanns, Clara and Robert. It’s well known that he became very close to the Schumann family, and […]

Residency at King’s College, Cambridge

Posted by Susan Tomes on 20 February 2013 under Concerts, Teaching  •  Leave a comment

This week also sees my mini-residency at King’s College, Cambridge. On Friday 22 Feb I’m giving a pre-concert talk at 7pm and a solo recital at 9pm – music by Haydn, Schumann and Billy Mayerl. On the morning of Saturday 23 Feb I’m giving a three-hour masterclass for music students of the college – piano […]

London Masterclass

Posted by Susan Tomes on 16 February 2013 under Teaching  •  Leave a comment

I have had a delightful time working with the young musicians who took part in my London masterclasses over the last two days. Thank you, Trio Fournier, Gagliano Ensemble, Trio Minori, Veronika Kopjova and Vashti Hunter! Chamber music is in safe hands if the hands are such as yours. We were lucky to be able […]

This week’s masterclasses

Posted by Susan Tomes on 11 February 2013 under Concerts, Teaching  •  1 Comment

It’s time once more for my own London masterclasses. This Thursday and Friday, Feb 14 and 15, I’ll be teaching four young professional chamber groups (see my Concerts and Events page for details). We’ll be working on Beethoven (a piano trio and a cello/piano sonata), a Brahms trio, a Mozart piano quartet, and some Shostakovich. […]