‘I can’t talk right now’

Back in the seventies, a friend told me he was reading a book by Marshall McLuhan on how technology was beginning to intrude into everyday life. ‘Apparently there is no activity which human beings will not interrupt in order to answer a ringing phone’, reported my friend. We laughed about it, and imagined a few of those scenarios. We reckoned that people would stop giving priority to the phone when they got used to having one. In my household, we all jumped when the phone rang, but that was partly because it was out in the hallway and had a very loud ring, and partly because it didn’t ring very often.

Of course, as it turned out, McLuhan had seen the shape of things to come. We didn’t downgrade the importance of the phone, even when we had all got used to having one. I thought of McLuhan yesterday when a colleague was telling me about a piano competition she adjudicated in Hong Kong. One of the competitors came on stage, started to play his piece, and then stopped to answer the mobile phone which was ringing in his pocket. He calmly told the caller that he couldn’t speak right now because he was playing in a piano competition, and then he put his phone away and resumed playing where he had left off. And when the adjudicators gave him a low mark, he came up afterwards and asked them why.

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This entry was posted on Friday 9th March 2012 at 7:23am and is filed under Concerts, Daily Life, Travel. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

2 Responses to “‘I can’t talk right now’”

  1. Stephen Dickinson said on

    This reminded me of a rather appalling story I heard on the radio. Please see:

  2. Trevor said on

    I wonder if that was because the pianist specifically had in his mind that because it was HIS phone, it was his job to answer it.

    Once in an eisteddfod, the phone at the back of the hall (land line, not mobile) started ringing while I was playing. It was a large hall, so it rang several times before anyone reached it. A number of people complimented me on how I kept going through what seemed a loud distraction, but the relevant part of my brain ignored it as ‘not my problem’. I heard the phone, yes, but the part of me that was focused on playing the piano simply wasn’t interested in what was happening elsewhere in the room.

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